Africa Now March 16, 2016 External Funding and Interventions of African Elections-The Case of Malawi; Hip Hop and Pan-Africanism; and Celebrating Women's History

Africa Now March 16, 2016

Topics: External Funding and Interventions of African Elections—The Case of Malawi; Hip Hop and Pan-Africanism; and Celebrating Women’s History 

Topics and Guests: Since 1994 Malawi has administered five multi-party elections: in 1994, 1999, 2004, 2009 and 2014.  In 2014 the country held its first tripartite elections: citizens went to the polls to decide on who would occupy the presidency, the national assembly and the local assemblies.  Western donor countries have played various roles in each election process—from observing to funding the entire exercise.  In February this year the Institute for Policy Interaction and the National Initiative for Civic Education released the book The Malawi 2014 Tripartite Elections: Is Democracy Maturing?  When Africa Now! Host Mwiza Munthali was in Malawi last month, he had the opportunity of discussing the role external funding and intervention of elections with activist Rafiq Hajat.  Mr. Hajat is co-author of the chapter entitled “External Funding and Donor Interventions” of the publication The Malawi 2014 Tripartite Elections: Is Democracy Maturing?  Mr. Rafiq Hajat is Executive Director of Institute for Policy Interaction (IPI) and a prominent human rights activist in Malawi.  He is the co-author of “Malawi’s Foreign Policy” in the textbook Government & Politics in Malawi, and has published several papers on human rights challenges posed by the mining sector in Malawi.  Mr. Hajat was in the top three nominees for the Frontline Human Rights Defenders Award in 2012. (Bio from book The Malawi 2014 Tripartite Elections: Is Democracy Maturing?)

As Africa Now! has highlighted before over the past few years, at the forefront of popular uprisings against injustice in the various parts of the African World have been the youth.  Youth activists from Burkina Faso of the Balai Citoyen (Citizen’s Broom) or from Senegal of Y’en a Marre (We’re Fed Up) or from the U.S. of Black Lives Matter or from South Africa of Fees Must Fall or the Telema movement in the DRC, have demanded a better world.  Hip hop culture has been front and center of this movement.  Today Africa Now! will spotlight the role of hip hop in Pan-Africanism.  Recently Dr. Msia Kibona Clark of Howard University focused on hip hop and Pan-Africanism at the panel discussion entitled Pan-Africanism in the 21st Century: Challenges and Prospects.  The event was sponsored by All African People’s Revolutionary Party, Friends of the Congo, Howard University African Studies Department, Ralph J. Bunche International Center of Howard University, Kammtherapy-Ottawa, Revival of Panafricanism Forum, and Institute for Policy Studies.  Dr. Msia Kibona Clark is an Assistant Professor in the Department of African Studies at Howard University.  She is originally from Tanzania and her research focuses on hip hop in Africa as cultural representation, and its use as social commentary.  In 2013-2014 she was Fulbright Scholar at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania where she researched the use of social media by Tanzanian hip hop artists.  Her research has included fieldwork in Ghana, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.  Dr. Clark has published several scholarly and non-scholarly articles and book chapters on topics relating to hip hop culture’s intersections with social change, gender, and politics in Africa.   She designed and teaches the course Hip Hop and Popular Culture in Africa at Howard University.

Africa Now! continues to highlight important issues in society of particular concern to women; and feature show’s regular March segment Women’s History Month Profile.  Today Africa Now! focuses on the work and philosophies of Yaa Asantewaa. The Women’s History Month Profile is presented by Africa Now! former Research Fellow Sitinga Kachipande. 

Click here to listen to Africa Now! of March 16, 2016 External Funding and Interventions of African Elections—The Case of Malawi; Hip Hop and Pan-Africanism; and Celebrating Women’s History.  

Originally broadcast on WPFW 89.3FM, Washington, DC.  Tune into Africa Now! live on WPFW 89.3 FM in the Washington, DC Metropolitan area or visit www.wpfwfm.org on Wednesdays from 1:00 to 2:00PM (Eastern).